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Session 24 – Publishing in international peer-reviewed journals

Timetable: Friday afternoon 1400-1630 in the Sonya Atalay Zoom Room Format: Workshop Session organiser: Robert Witcher, Editor Antiquity This session will provide early career researchers with insights into the journals publishing process, using Antiquity as a case study (other journals are available!). The session will include a presentation to provide an overview of each stepContinue reading “Session 24 – Publishing in international peer-reviewed journals”

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Session 23 – Experimental Archaeology as Performance

Timetable: Saturday afternoon 1430-1800 in the Theresa Singleton Zoom Room. Format: Standard session Organisers: Caradoc Peters, Sally Herriett, Stuart Falconer Contact: rutcpeters@plymouth.ac.uk; sallyherriett@truro-penwith.ac.uk; rutsfalconer@plymouth.ac.uk Archaeologists’ work is often thought of a mixture of humanities, science and technology, but it is also Theatre (cf. Pearson & Shanks 2001). How much more so when archaeologists are involvedContinue reading “Session 23 – Experimental Archaeology as Performance”

Session 22 – Archaeologies of the Near Future

Timetable: Saturday morning 0930-1300 in the Sonya Atalay Zoom Room. Format: 10min papers Organiser: Jim Leary Contact: jim.leary@york.ac.uk This session invites the audience to imagine the role of archaeology in the year AD2220; a future world in which we are the past. It asks you to project yourselves, not into the past as archaeologists areContinue reading “Session 22 – Archaeologies of the Near Future”

Session 21 – Lost Souls: Breathing life into the fragmented dead

Timetable: Friday afternoon 1400-1730 in the Alison Wylie Zoom Room Format: Half day workshop Organisers: Jacqui Mulville, Julia Best, Adelle Bricking, Katie Faillace, Bethan Healey, Eirini Konstantinidi, Michael Legge Contact: mulvilleja@cardiff.ac.uk, bestj3@cardiff.ac.uk, BrickingAA@cardiff.ac.uk, FaillaceKE@cardiff.ac.uk, b.healey@outlook.com, konstantinidie1@cardiff.ac.uk, Michaellegge1991@gmail.com Abstract: This session looks at the strategies that archaeologists use to deal with the isolated, the eroding, the assembled and theContinue reading “Session 21 – Lost Souls: Breathing life into the fragmented dead”

Session 20 – A Place to call home: the archaeology of space and belonging

Timetable: Friday afternoon 1430-1730 in the Theresa Singleton Zoom Room Format: Standard Organisers: Rachel Cartwright and Manuel Fernandez Gotz Contact: cartw054@umn.edu; M.Fernandez-Gotz@ed.ac.uk Places are more than just mere geographical locations, as they can evoke a powerful sense of belonging and become a fundamental part of people’s identities. Place identity has long been used in environmental psychology and isContinue reading “Session 20 – A Place to call home: the archaeology of space and belonging”

Session 19 – On Artificial Past Lives: Uses and Consequences of Artificial Intelligence, Data Science and Simulation in Archaeology

Timetable: Friday morning 0930-1110 in the Theresa Singleton Zoom Room Format: Standard Organisers: Daniel Carvalho Contact: danielcarvalho1@campus.ul.pt Our present lives are profoundly impacted by the new Technological Revolution. Data has become the new currency, with a plethora of applications on contemporary problems. But what about the Past? Current investigations in Artificial Intelligence and Simulation are not only providingContinue reading “Session 19 – On Artificial Past Lives: Uses and Consequences of Artificial Intelligence, Data Science and Simulation in Archaeology”

Session 18 – Gender in death: approaches to revealing gendered experiences in funerary contexts

Timetable: Saturday afternoon 1430-1745 in the Sonya Atalay Zoom Room Format: Standard Organisers: Penny Bickle, Lindsey Buster, Kate Morris, Danny Shaw Contact: penny.bickle@york.ac.uk, lindsey.buster@york.ac.uk, klm543@york.ac.uk, ds1409@york.ac.uk Understanding life in the past is a key element of archaeological interpretation and, paradoxically, the study of death can offer distinct insights, particularly with regards to identity and gender. Funerary archaeology hasContinue reading “Session 18 – Gender in death: approaches to revealing gendered experiences in funerary contexts”

Session 17 – Historical Ecological Lives in a Digital Ethos: understanding past life in current-state Landscape Archaeology

Timetable: Saturday morning 0930-1200 in the Whitney Battle-Baptiste Zoom Room Format: Standard Organisers: Pablo Barruezo-Vaquero and David Laguna Palma Contact: p.barruezo-vaquero.1@research.gla.ac.uk; dlaguna@ugr.es Landscape Archaeology has greatly evolved since its inception. In such a development, however, there is one constant feature: technology. In this sense, Landscape Archaeology has been one of the most avant-garde subdisciplines within Archaeology. Currently, itContinue reading “Session 17 – Historical Ecological Lives in a Digital Ethos: understanding past life in current-state Landscape Archaeology”

Session 16 – Sensing Textiles and Cogitating Crafting Technology

Timetable: Friday morning 0930-1300 in the Whitney Battle-Baptiste Zoom Room Format: Standard Organisers: Jennifer Beamer Contact: jkb32@leicester.ac.uk The primary goal of this session is to create a common framework that will engender inter- and intradisciplinary discussions of how to address textiles and craft technology theories and methods in the 21st Century. The intention of this session is toContinue reading “Session 16 – Sensing Textiles and Cogitating Crafting Technology”

Session 15 – Everyday Life and Ritual Life – Can We Distinguish?

Timetable: Saturday afternoon 1430-1645 in the Uzma Rivzi Zoom Room Format: Standard Organiser: Peter S. Wells Contact: wells001@umn.edu In study of the prehistoric past, what methods and approaches can we use to distinguish the material remains of everyday life – of subsistence practices, construction techniques, craft activities – from the remains of “ritual” activity, such as the buildingContinue reading “Session 15 – Everyday Life and Ritual Life – Can We Distinguish?”